Paula Dieli

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

We can be so focused on our day-to-day work that we forget to step back, review the work we’ve been doing, and think about how we might share with our colleagues some of the things we’ve developed or enhanced. What work have you done lately that made things better for you, your direct reports, or the teams you support? What about that new scheduling template you used to extract milestones from your team? Or the virtual offsite agenda you tried out that really got people to open up and participate? Or a more productive way to use an online collaborative tool for retrospectives? Our new remote work situation is as good a time as any to offer up a new best practice to your colleagues with the goal of enabling others to be more productive. And let’s face it, it feels good too!

--

--

Photo by Mae Mu on Unsplash

Effective program management requires that you have your finger on the pulse of everything that’s going on related to the program and are available to the program team as needed. The number of programs a program manager can handle simultaneously varies but they know when their plate is full, so to speak. When you get to that point — when the number of requests for support is greater than what you can handle, rather than take on more programs with less than optimal support for each, I’d rather see ruthless prioritization so you can do your best work on the most important programs. Otherwise you run the risk of leaving your team members feeling unsatisfied and with an inaccurate view of the real value of program management.

--

--

Photo by Matteo Vistocco on Unsplash

Program managers are all about getting others to do things. They know who the domain experts are and they harness all of that wonderful expertise to get a program across the line. They facilitate rather than do the work themselves. They are objective, focused on the program and how it…

--

--

Paula Dieli

Paula Dieli

Obsessively passionate about helping software companies run well.